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Google’s Vic Gundotra: Future Nexus hones will have ‘insanely great cameras’

Google's Gundotra


Google’s Senior Vice President of Engineering, Vic Gundotra, gave a response on Google+ the other evening to a comment made by someone who hoped for the day when future Nexus phones could one day surpass the image quality of DSLR cameras. Gundotra specifically stated in response that “We are committed to making Nexus phones insanely great cameras. Just wait and see.” While the current Nexus 4 camera may be sufficient towards its purposes, there are still better.

Android devices with the Nexus moniker have been coveted because of reasons that include the quick software update cycle with little to no carrier and manufacturer interference and great comparative pricing. However, the physical build, quality of manufacturing materials, and the camera quality have been points of criticism to the Nexus line. Google’s Nexus smartphone lineup has been a great for developers and software aficionados, but it has consistently lagged behind the iPhone when it comes to the camera quality. Google will be holding Google I/O Conference later this year which is their annually held conference in San Francisco, California where they have in-depth sessions on building and improving web, mobile, and enterprise applications that Google has to offer. According to Venturebeat, “Google’s most recent Nexus phone, the LG-made Nexus 4, has a nice camera, but it pales in comparison to the iPhone 5. As Apple, Nokia, and HTC have consistently improved their smartphone camera technology, it’s something that seems to have been ignored by the Nexus line. Given the popularity of mobile photo apps like Instagram, having a strong camera on-board will be increasingly important for consumers.” We are confident that if Google wants users to continue to want their devices and purchase the Nexus 7 and/or the Nexus 4 in the future than they have to get serious about improvements to a few things such as the cameras with improvements in not only pixels, but in the optics and image sensors.

Learn more the author of this post:

Solomon Massele
Solomon is our Senior Managing Editor here at TekGoblin and he is also a columnist for Best Buy Mobile Magazine. He has been a technology enthusiast for years and currently contributes to companies such as TekGoblin, Best Buy Mobile Magazine, and others in the past such as SPJ Reviews. You can keep up with his updates on Twitter at @iceman7679 and his visual tech related reviews on YouTube at www.youtube.com/iceman7679. He loves everything tech, and talking about it!
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